SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY = BETTER BIRTH CONTROL

ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL

There are a lot of birth control options and lots of outdated information. Explore modern birth controls and find one that is best for you.

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IUDs are safe, lasts 3-12 years, and once you get it, there’s nothing to do for it to work really well at preventing pregnancy.

Quick facts

The IUD is a little, T-shaped piece of plastic that sits in your uterus to prevent sperm from finding an egg or fertilizing an egg. Sounds a little odd, but it works like a charm. There are two types of IUDs: one without hormones that contains copper and one with hormones that contain progestin (progesterone).  Pharmaceutical companies have marketed various names for the four types of IUDs that have progestin, but they all work the same way clinically.  Also the copper IUD can be used as emergency contraception within 5 days of unprotected sex.  IUDs offer years of  pregnancy protection—between 3 to 12 years, but you can remove the IUD anytime regardless of the one you select.  When you are ready to  get pregnant, you can have the IUD removed  and fertility quickly returns to baseline.

EFFECTIVENESS

TYPICAL 99+%

WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO DO

It’s inserted once by a healthcare provider and lasts 3-12 years depending on which one you select. Don’t worry, if you select one that works for 5 years but you want it out sooner, no problem.  Remember, this method is great for pregnancy prevention but doesn’t protect you from STIs- so don’t forget condoms.

SIDE EFFECTS

Depends on which one you select. With hormones, you may have some spotting and unpredictable bleeding early on, but most women after several months,  don’t get monthly periods anymore (hooray!). Without hormones (copper one)  you will still have cyclic periods (for some this is hooray!) but it may be heavier, especially in the first year.

COST

Cost: $0-$2000 for both insertion and device. If you have insurance of ANY type, we ask to use this. If you don’t, we will see if you qualify for any plans offered by the Juno4Me provider.  But if you don’t have insurance or qualify for any other plans, no problem at all.  Juno4Me will cover this.

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There’s nothing to think about in the moment and it’s hidden from everyone.

Quick facts

The contraceptive implant  is a teeny-tiny rod (size of a match stick) that’s inserted under the skin of your upper arm. It’s so small, in fact, most people can’t see it once it’s inserted—which means it can be your little secret, if you’re so inclined. But remember for the first few days after insertion,  you will likely have pressure tape, band-aid and slight bruising at the site (long sleeves can cover this up!).   The implant releases progestin which prevents your ovaries from releasing an egg and thickens your cervical mucus, which helps to block sperm from getting to the egg in the first place. Plus, it prevents pregnancy for up to four years.

EFFECTIVENESS

TYPICAL 99+%

WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO DO

Quick insertion by a healthcare provider and lasts for up to 4 years. The provider will numb the area of your skin with a tiny needle to make sure you don’t feel pain before inserting the implant. Remember, the implant is great for pregnancy prevention, but you must use condoms for STI/HIV protection.

SIDE EFFECTS

Non-cyclic bleeding and irregular spotting,  especially in the first six months to one year (pantiliners will be your new BFF). The amount of  bleeding is no more than your regular period, but it can come and go.  Some users may have no periods or very light spotting after year one.  If at anytime you decide you want to be pregnant, a healthcare provider can remove this (Juno4Me providers do free removals) and your fertility quickly returns to baseline.

COST

Cost: $0-$2000 for both insertion and device. If you have insurance of ANY type, we ask to use this. But if no insurance, the health center will see if you qualify for any plans. But if you don’t, no worries,  Juno4Me covers this so you don’t have to worry about paying anything.

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Immediately effective, must be used with spermicidal foam or gel,  no hormones, can be inserted up to 6 hours before sex.

Quick facts

Cervical caps & Diaphragms are are shallow, dome-shaped cups made of latex or silicone. They’re off-white and about an inch and a half in diameter. You insert it into your vagina before sex and it covers your cervix to keeps sperm out of your uterus. One super important thing to remember: you must use these with spermicide foam or gel for it to be effective.

EFFECTIVENESS

TYPICAL USE 79% - 88%

WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO DO

It must be in place every time you have sex and ideally used with a spermicide foam/gel. You must keep it in place several hours afterwards to really minimize the risk of pregnancy.

SIDE EFFECTS

Usually no side effects. Some women might experience irritation or discomfort especially from the spermicide. Remember you have to be fitted for this and the size may change after having a baby.

COST

Cervical cap/Diaphragm: Pay once for fitting ($0-$200)and  barrier cup with spermicide ($0-$100)

Juno4Me doesn’t cover this birth control method but you can still get it at some family planning centers. Make an appointment with your healthcare provider to get more information,  though it may be difficult to find providers who regularly fit them (because it’s not used that often anymore). If you don’t have a regular provider that you can talk to about birth control, you can find a family planning provider here.

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Good for 3 months, private, and a good hormonal choice for those who can’t take estrogen and don’t want an IUD or Implant.

Quick facts

The shot is just what it sounds like—an injection that keeps you from getting pregnant. Once you get it, your birth control is covered for three full months—there’s nothing else you have to do.  Well except return to the clinic 4 times/year.  The shot contains progestin, a hormone that prevents your ovaries from releasing eggs. It also thickens your cervical mucus, which helps block sperm from getting to the egg in the first place. Some women say they don’t want the shot because they’re afraid of needles. But what’s a little shot compared to a pregnancy?

EFFECTIVENESS

PERFECT USE 99% TYPICAL USE 94%

WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO DO

You have to go for a shot every 3 months with your healthcare provider.

SIDE EFFECTS

Most common are irregular bleeding and some may notice an increased appetite, leading to weight gain. Also, you have to be sure you can make it to your quarterly appointments with your provider. The effectiveness starts decreasing after 12-14 weeks so don’t be late.

COST

From $0-$120.

Juno4Me covers the most difficult methods to access and the most costly methods- IUDs and the implant. But if you are interested in using the shot,  make an appointment with your healthcare provider to get a prescription for the shot- it’s pretty common. If you don’t have a regular provider that you can talk to about birth control, you can find a family planning provider here.

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Easy to insert, works like the pill, keeps you protected for a month at a time.

Quick facts

The vaginal ring is a small, bendable clear-colored plastic circle that you insert into your vagina. You leave it in place for three weeks at a time, then take it out for the fourth week. The ring contains estrogen and progesterone that prevent your ovaries from releasing eggs. The hormones also thicken your cervical mucus, which helps to block sperm from getting to the egg in the first place.

EFFECTIVENESS

PERFECT USE 99% TYPICAL USE 91%

WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO DO

Ring in. Wait 3 weeks. Ring out. Wait 1 week. Repeat. Also be sure you store your rings in a place that doesn’t get too hot or too cold or they may not work so well.

SIDE EFFECTS

Most common—yet temporary—effects are irregular bleeding, breast tenderness, and nausea. With time, periods become predictable and usually lighter.

COST

Anywhere from $0-$75 a month.

Juno4Me covers the most difficult methods to access and the most costly methods- IUDs and the implant. But if you want to try the ring,  make an appointment with your healthcare provider to get a prescription, it’s pretty easy. If you don’t have a regular provider that you can talk to about birth control, you can find a family planning provider here.

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Been around for 50 years, easy to swallow, can have positive side effects.

Quick facts

“The Pill”is a pill. (How’s that for stating the obvious?) Some people call it “oral contraception” because you take it orally (by mouth) every day.  For it to work well for pregnancy prevention, you have to remember to take the pill at the same time every day. There are lots of different kinds of pills on the market, and new ones come out all the time. They all contain progestin which prevents your ovaries from releasing eggs and many have estrogen which works to regulate cyclic bleeding. The hormones also thicken your cervical mucus, which helps to block sperm from getting to the egg in the first place.

EFFECTIVENESS

PERFECT USE 99% TYPICAL USE 91%

WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO DO

Take the pill at the SAME time Every. Single. Day.

SIDE EFFECTS

Most common are sore breasts, nausea, spotting, and possibly decreased sex drive. Pills will cause predictable bleeding  with usually lighter periods and lighter cramps. Some people take the pills to manage other medical problems not related to pregnancy prevention.

COST

As low as$0 or as high as $113 a month.

Juno4Me covers the most difficult methods to access and the most costly methods- IUDs and the implant.  But if you want to try the pill, make an appointment with your healthcare provider to get a prescription; most providers can easily write you a prescription.  You can also look for on line options as there are more and more services offering mail delivery of monthly pills.  If you don’t have a regular provider that you can talk to about birth control, you can find a family planning provider here.

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Easy to use and works like the pill, but you only have to worry about changing it once a week.

Quick facts

The  contraceptive patch is a thin, beige piece of plastic that looks like a square Band-Aid. It’s a little less than two inches across, and comes in one—and only one—color (beige).  You stick the patch on your skin and it releases  estrogen and progestin which prevent your ovaries from releasing eggs. The hormones also thicken your cervical mucus, which helps to block sperm from getting to the egg in the first place.

EFFECTIVENESS

PERFECT USE 99% TYPICAL USE 91%

WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO DO

You have to remember to change the patch every week for 3 weeks. You usually rotate to different parts of your body/belly/bum as sometimes the adhesive where the hormones are located can leave a slight red mark.  You don’t wear a patch on the 4th week and this is when you have your withdrawal bleed or “period”. You must remember to change weekly and restart after your patch free week.

SIDE EFFECTS

Some nausea and breast tenderness  especially early on. Small percentage of users get redness where the patch was placed; rarely is it an allergy versus more of an irritation. Most users will have cyclic bleeding, lighter bleeding, and lighter cramps.

COST

Could be as low as $0 a month or as high as $60.

Juno4Me cover the methods that are hardest to get and most expensive- IUDs and the implant. But you can get a prescription for the patch with most healthcare providers. Make an appointment with your healthcare provider to get more information. If you  don’t have a regular provider that you can talk to about birth control, you can find a family planning provider here.

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They can protect against STIs, don’t require a prescription, and are readily available (if you plan ahead).

Quick facts

Male condoms are one of the most popular forms of birth control out there. They slip over a man’s erected penis to prevent pregnancy and lower the risk of STIs by keeping his sperm inside the condom and out of your vagina. There are hundreds of shapes and sizes to choose from, with lube and without. Many use a condom and a hormonal birth control to protect from both STIs and pregnancy-smart.

EFFECTIVENESS

PERFECT USE 98% TYPICAL USE 82%

WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO DO

You have to use one EVERY time during the entire act of intercourse.

SIDE EFFECTS

None usually. Unless you have a latex allergy. Must be carefully removed to avoid sperm spilling out.  Condoms can slide off or break. This is a good time to think about emergency contraception (EC).

COST

About $1 per condom or free at lots of health centers. Some insurances, even Medicaid will cover a prescription for condoms.   Most condoms are the same quality but there are a lot of different colors, textures, sizes, and flavors.

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Women controlled, it’s completely up to you.

Quick facts

A female condom is a lubricated pouch you insert into your vagina. It’s not the prettiest thing in the world, but it does give you more control than a male condom when it comes to preventing pregnancy and STIs. Female condoms work the same way that male condoms do, except that you wear one on the inside instead of the guy wearing it on the outside. They keep sperm inside the condom and out of your vagina.

EFFECTIVENESS

PERFECT USE 95% TYPICAL USE 79%

WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO DO

You have to use one EVERY time. You have to feel comfortable with inserting the ring of the condom inside your vagina, similar to a tampon.

SIDE EFFECTS

Usually none, but could cause a little irritation to your or your guy’s parts.

COST

Depending on where you get them, $0-$5 a piece, available over the counter. Some insurances, including Medicaid may cover them but you need to ask for a prescription.

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If you don’t have sex, you won’t get pregnant. But you’ll need willpower. And if you just don’t feel ready and don’t feel comfortable, abstinence is exactly what you need to do.

Quick facts

“Not right now”is our way of saying “no vaginal sex.” It’s a great method as far as effectiveness is concerned—if you use it 100% of the time, you’re guaranteed to not get pregnant. And if you’re avoiding sexual activity all together, you’ll be safe from STIs too. But it does involve a whole lot of self-control.

EFFECTIVENESS

PERFECT USE 100%

WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO DO

Saying “not right now” only works as a birth control method if you do it consistently, so it takes a lot of self-control. If you’re dating or in a relationship, you’ll need to be able to tell your partner what’s okay  and what’s not. Which means you need to be comfortable with speaking your mind. If you are in a relationship, you’ve both got to be down with the plan. But remember, saying “not right now” doesn’t mean you’re not allowed to have fun. It’s actually a great excuse to get creative and learn about each other.

SIDE EFFECTS

Can be difficult to maintain.

COST

Waiting requires patience, but it doesn’t cost a thing.

BIRTH CONTROL THAT REALLY WORKS

Learn more about the IUD and Implant and hear why
these women love these birth control methods.

TELL YOUR FRIENDS ABOUT JUNO4ME
ON YOUR MARK, GET SET, GO!

Get peace of mind with these checklists

Juno4Me_Icons_v1-hirest_Before Your Call

BEFORE THE CALL

Everything you need to know before your phone rings.

Juno4Me_Icons_v1-hirest_Before Appointment

BEFORE THE APPOINTMENT

Make sure you have everything ready before heading out.

Juno4Me_Icons_v1-hirest_After Appointment

AFTER THE APPOINTMENT

Make sure you know what to do and start living without limits.

Juno4Me_Icons_v1-hirest_When to Contact

WHEN TO CONTACT US

Know when it’s time to contact your health care provider or Juno4Me.

TAKE DOWN THE
RED TAPE—THIS
DECISION IS YOURS

Don’t forget to book an appointment

oh, and don’t forget to always wear a condom, as this is the best way to protect against STIs.